Right Arm Trigger

THE RIGHT ARM at address is slightly lower than the left arm and is slightly flexed. The upper right arm is in contact with the chest and is vertical to the ground. The initial motion of the right arm is caused to be moved by the right hip pulling back. At the completion of this horizontal movement of the right hip, the left arm is pointing down the stance line parallel to the target line. The right thumb is pointing directly down a line away from the target, parallel to the target line. The shaft is horizontal to the ground, parallel to the target line parallel to the stance line. The right forearm is parallel to the ground. The hands are at their lowest point in relationship to the ground. At this point all HORIZONTAL body motion away from the target stops.

All motion of the hands and arms from this position to the top of the backswing is VERTICAL. All the motion of the down swing, which returns the hands to their low point position, is vertical. This vertical motion of the hands and arms to the top of the backswing is caused by the cocking of the right elbow towards the right shoulder.
This cocking of the right elbow causes the hands to rotate to the right so that the back of the right hand is flat against the swing plane.
This cocking of the right elbow causes the left wrist to cock.
This cocking of the right elbow causes the left arm to be raised to its cocked position.
The extensor action force of the right heel pad exerted on the left thumb causes the left shoulder to be rotated around the spine to its position at the top of the backswing. This position can be 90 or more degrees away from the target. At the top of the backswing the right forearm is vertical to the ground. The right upper arm is horizontal to the ground.

The Downswing begins by releasing the tension in the right elbow. The right arm goes from a cocked position at the top of the downswing to a fully extended straight right arm shortly after impact. The right arm then caused to fold as centrifugal force carries the club over the left shoulder.

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